Russian charts at the CA

Atlas Cover

Atlas Cover

Side Elevation Diagram from Canal Atlas

Side Elevation Diagram from Canal Atlas

The Entrance to the Canals at Belamorsk

The Entrance to the Canals at Belamorsk

Diagrams of the Canal Bridges

Diagrams of the Canal Bridges

A Typical Section of "Canal"

A Typical Section of “Canal”

6th December 2013

During our Russian Meeting No 1 at Kentish Town Graham kindly suggested that he may be able to arrange a viewing of the Cruising Associations collection of Russian Charts. On Friday evening Grit and I arrived at the CA to take up the offer.
Graham and Fay had found the folio of charts, maps and “atlases” which were stored in the loft and had arranged them in organised piles on a large table in the Committee Room. We had the luxury of a whole evening to study them.
The charts are of significance because they belonged to the first pioneer yachts to make the journey. Some charts were marked with Wallace Clark who was the father of Miles Clark who sailed White Goose through the whole canal system sadly dying before finally completing the journey. The book “Sailing Around Russia” was completed by Wallace Clark.

We had a variety of aeronautical charts, maps, navigational charts from British Admiralty and Russian Sources plus three “Atlases”. These Atlases were books of charts plus side elevations and diagrams and photos of bridges. These books were fascinating and contained everything needed to navigate the “canal”. I suppose naïvely I rather had the impression that the journey would be a matter of entering and leaving a canal into a big open lake and then entering the next canal. It is apparent from the charts and atlases that it is all a bit more complicated. The canal joins into small areas of open water and buoyed channels and even when you exit into a massive lake there are large shallow areas and areas ridden with weed and rocky outcrops. That said, certainly from these 40 year old charts, there are plenty of navigational markers to help us on our way.

Looking at used charts has the benefit of being able to take heed of various notes written on the charts. Even knowing which town is which is tricky without a copy of the Russian alphabet to hand. Markings pointing to reporting Radio Stations reinforce the need to have Russian speakers on board.

Grit and I have taken extensive notes from the charts and we have posted a couple of pictures we have taken to give a feeling of the quality of the charts. The charts we studied were clear and easy to understand (given access to the Russian alphabet). It looks like we will need to purchase two Volumes (Toms) to complete the sections from the White Sea to St Petersburg plus various lake charts and charts of the White Sea. Obviously there will be more charts needed to cover our exit from Russia into the Baltic. It could be quite an expense.

 

 

Leave a Reply